Gender equality begins at home

Fifty percent of us are women. And there is a Women’s Day, yes. Yet, there are scores of stories about the struggles, achievements, journeys, and worries of women in our cities. We cannot cram all these into a paper just on Women’s Day. So for our part at Citizen Matters, as the city’s premier newsmagazine, we simply decided to dedicate this issue on the theme. And we found plenty to report to you.

Many of us may not pay attention to women related topics, unless we spend a conscience-pricked hour in front of Satyameva Jayate. But much of society’s attitude is reflected in our homes.

Here are a few things to internalise as parents. If you are already there, more power to you!

1. Be a feminist!
Chances are, you don’t see yourself as a feminist. You may retort, men and women are not the same. The thing is feminism is not an alien concept. It is just about agreeing men and women are politically, socially and economically equal.

2. Find your children strong women role models
Let them watch Indira Nooyi talk on Youtube. Tell them about India’s leading women boxer, Mary Kom, a medal hope in the 2012 London Olympics.

3. Fathers and mothers, set an example
Share your home chores with each other and set an example for your child. Remember, tomorrow, your son is not going to live in a society where somebody will pick up after him. You would not want your daughter to live in a society which expects her pick up after others. Teach your son and daughter to cook.

4. Don’t pamper
Don’t pamper your son or daughter. Especially, don’t pamper your son more than your daughter. Teach them life skills and make them strong. Just like it is important to leave a better world for our kids, we need to leave better kids for the world!

5. Question stereotyped roles in media
There are few TV shows and movies with independent or strong women characters. Think about how your children can overcome such biases and influences.

About Meera K 41 Articles
Meera K is Co-founder, Citizen Matters.

2 Comments

  1. Perhaps, we can collectively raise our children to be more conscientious – boys or girls, it shouldn’t matter. Do we really need more corporate CEOs selling us things we don’t need, and in turn using up world’s resources irresponsibly?

  2. I agree with the points mentioned here – Yes, do not raise sons and daughters differently.

    But, I am really curious – What is Pepsico doing right that I want my daughter learning from their corporate team?

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